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One of our recent MA graduates, Sinan Büyükbaş is a very talented guy indeed – one whose skills extend into many different areas, from sound design to video to graphic design. Above are a few images from his latest creative foray, his 3D Kandinsky typeface. More images can be seen here:
http://www.behance.net/gallery/KANDINSKY-TYPE/4039379

And 2 months later I am back with this update:

He went and made it to the front page! :-)

http://www.graffititechnica.com/

“Graphic design is pure semiotics in action. Design theory should be based on semiotics, but there needs to be much more development to make that happen. To that end, I offer for designers, and for those interested in visual semiotics, this collection of conceptual tools. This primer is a compilation and condensation of articles I’ve published over several years. They are entirely revised here for a non-specialist, general audience. Each chapter opens as a pdf.”

Brilliant resource on Steven Skaggs’ website, which takes you through the intrinsic relationship between these two fields:
http://stevenskaggs.net/SemioticPrimerContents.htm

Thank you Steven!

http://www.flickr.com/groups/brandicted/
http://www.flickr.com/groups/77871177@N00/
http://www.flickr.com/groups/780785@N24/

View more images here:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/rekadiosi/sets/72157628063999707/with/6369044531/

“Bugün Ne Giysem?” (“What Shall I Wear Today?”) is a TV show in Turkey where female contestants dress themselves and get critique from judges (fashion icons/designers) who decide whether they go through to the next round or not. The show claims to be in search of “the most stylish woman in Turkey”. The judges also claim that they are educating the viewers while giving critique to the contestants and thus leading Turkish women towards a better-looking future. As an avid fan of the show, however, I observe that their method is flawed. I propose that they may do better in their idealistic task if they take one step further in their educating. Now I don’t know a thing about fashion or clothing, but I’ll make my case as a (visual communication) design professional and you’ll see how it relates.

This is something I wrote on my blog and Elif Ayiter asked me to share it here; I believe it may be fun/useful for design students. Read more here.

— Cem

http://www.newnihilism.com/

Our graduate student Servet Ulaş has just published a highly thought provoking post on his own blog. I urgently advise everyone who is interested in typeface design to go and read it:
http://servetulas.com/blog/2011/10/the-uncanny-valley-and-casual-script-typefaces/
Thank you Servet!

This is a nice tool for interactive drawing. Using Jay’s application you can draw really complex (and cool!) looking images. It’s basically a line drawing tool where you just put dots on the canvas and they create lines – But the trick is, the new point you put gets connected with the nearest dots you already drew. The result is a geometric line explosion and it really looks incredible if you use it the right way (just look at the images). There is a <a title=”web app for sketchy structures” href=”http://jayweeks.com/sketchy-structures-html5-canvas/#/ web application that you can instantly play with and also an Adobe Illustrator Scriptographer script  (for the latter, take a look at scriptographer page on how to install and use it- it’s an amazingly good tool for illustrator fans!, you’ll thank me..)

Can anyone tell me why we never see these kind of posters on street of istanbul? let alone istanbul, at least on facebook event pages or something?.. Ok i’ll calm down.. Just check them out and see how they engage you to go to your fav band’s gig..

These doodles were produced by Andrew van der Merwe using instruments and techniques he has developed over the past 6 years. They just blew me away. Especially the carefully calculated meticulous stroke modulations. No kidding, I am definitely going to try out this summer in Bodrum, though the beaches there are not nearly as flat.

“The more complex-looking characters in some pieces are usually taken from the Adinkra symbols of the Akan people of Ghana and the Ivory Coast. The last piece was inspired by the structure the characters on Bamana mud cloth.”



Sabanci University’s interest in supporting research output has been one of the primary initiatives of Image of Science, which will now run its second season July 11 – 15 on campus. Image of Science is a university wide collaboration, open to outside participation this year, organized by visiting faculty Gokhan Ersan (School of the Art Institute of Chicago),  Melih Papila (FENS), VAVCD teaching assistants, and Nancy Karabeyoglu (SUWC).

Image of Science seeks to familiarize researchers with design tools that can comprehensively depict complex research methodologies and findings. 

This year’s week long program of workshops and design tutorials focuses on creating interactive slide shows and presentations of completed or ongoing research. Two days of workshops on implementing design strategies open the program; three days of design work to produce interactive slide shows/presentation of selected submissions follow. All are welcome.

If you have  a visual image of a particular ongoing/completed research project and/or would like to learn more of design’s ability to serve as a powerful information source, please consider attending either the workshops or design production; both are free.

The links below are the formal invitation to Image of Science.

Website

http://iscience.sabanciuniv.edu

Registration/Submissions 

http://iscience.sabanciuniv.edu/workshop-apply/apply-ws2.html

Pages containing the work of last year’s projects

http://iscience.sabanciuniv.edu/projects/projects-emrah-p1-intro.html

http://www.rizon.be/#/work

To design a series of theater posters is a challenging task itself. I know this from my own experience at Purdue University illustrating the entire 2008-2009 season. I had to read each play and come up with bunch of metaphors that aimed to convey the overall ‘feel’ of the play. However, to design a series of theater posters that defies and embodies the ‘third dimension’ is even more challenging. When it is well done results can be astonishing. The series below were done by Alfalfa Studio, which were commissioned by a theater company from Texas. If you are interested in these kind of ‘to the point’ poster design I would recommend you study the God of Opera Poster Designer “Pierre Mendell”.

http://idnworld.com/mags/?id=v16n5