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Category Archives: Typography

http://www.substudio.com/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaelpaukner/

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A friend of mine from Second Life has compiled this flickr set – and it is an absolute gem of a collection which you can see right here:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/eupalinos/sets/72157621948073656/

 

http://www.infojocks.com/

Brilliant!

Although Paul Hollingworth’s typographic assemblages do not relate directly to art and computation, I still find that the emergent/organic visual language may create inspirations for the field. View more here.

Very cool project created by Section Design, UK for Wired Italy. More images here. Also check out the Flickr set to see how the whole project came together:

Very cool indeed…

I had actually checked out issuu a long time ago but had never really uploaded anything. Today, the hung-over aftermath of a somewhat raucous New Year’s Eve, seemed to be a good time to play around with something like this. I have uploaded a few things and particularly this one presentation from 2005 which I have always rather liked and which I have never posted anywhere (image above is the link).

Issuu seems to be great, except for a few things to pay attention to: Do not use solid dark backgrounds. Black does look good – nice and shiny, but dark grays give you the most god awful moire effect. Sometimes the conversion takes forever, and there is no rhyme or reason for it that I could make out, larger files may take less than smaller stuff. Another problem is that whatever format you may choose, you seem to end up with a flip book – or at least I did. Then again, I have not checked out all of the options yet. And finally, something assembled out of landscape formatted pages looks much better than portrait type pages stuck together since rather than go by the width/height of your original upload file, Issuu seems to fit things to the screen widthwise, so anything which is too high looks really huge and clumsy.

But, all in all, it is quite a cool place to publish stuff.

I put these together for our 3rd year project studio class since their current job is designing a calendar. Many more on behance for them to look at also of course…

Very successful Letterpress work (and also beautiful documentation) by Scott Boms, Grant Hutchinson and Luke Dorny via FPO (For Print Only blog).

Write a Bike project from Typography Served blog.

Christopher Berry on The Guide to Gentlemanly Pursuits:

http://bldgwlf.com/christopher-berry/

“In an attempt to honor the sections of old growth forest I’ve likely destroyed, The Guide to Gentlemanly Pursuits is an experiment I’ve undertaken for the summer. The rules are simple:

1) Collect all napkins and meeting notes.
2) Draw a moustache on every doodle.
3) Present the best of the week.”

See his full portfolio – an utter delight! – here:
http://ivoryhighrise.com/

Follow his blog here:
http://ilikeyougraphik.blogspot.com/

Great article about the history and application of slab serifs and Sentinel font made by Hoefler & Frere Jones. Read the entire article from here.

 


His gorgeous website can be viewed here:
http://www.legarconbleu.com/




http://denisolenik.com/

View behance portfolio here:
http://www.behance.net/maximalist

Typography tips and tutorials from Fontshop, all downloadable for free. I especially recommend “Erik Spiekermann’s Typo Tips (Seven Rules for Better Typography).”

This is the website of the advertising agency Grip Limited. It is marvelous both in its functional interface and its visual design.

Here is a comment by Hoefler & Frere-Jones who designed the Knockout typeface used throughout the website:

When we designed the Knockout type family, which celebrates the exuberance of nineteenth century wood type, we wondered: what designer would knowingly use the fonts to recall a world of quack medical cures and traveling vaudevillians? The answer, as it so often turns out to be, is “smart aleck Canadian advertising agencies.” Behold the truly excellent Grip Limited, who have created a typographic tour-de-force in Knockout (and a little Archer) that really repays scrolling in all directions. I especially like the end of the second column.